Michael Jackson’s legacy is at stake ahead of a documentary showing he is accused of sexual assault

0
57

Nearly 10 years after his sudden death, Michael Jackson’s legacy is being re-examined, this time in a documentary about allegations of sexual abuse of two children, which the singer’s family met with anger.

Living Neverland is the title of the film, which tells the story of two men, Wade Robinson and James Saevsk, one in their thirties and the other in their forties.

The two men in the film say Jackson is close to them and sexually abused them when they were 7 and 10, respectively.

They also describe, in detail, their experience in the early 1990’s at Jackson Ranch in Neverland and elsewhere, and say that they, as children, adored the singer.

It is scheduled to be broadcast on the American channel “HBO” on the third and fourth of March next, and the sixth and seventh of the same month on the British Channel IV.

The family of the pop king, who left in June 2009, attacked the film, while the singer “Thriller” filed a lawsuit against HBO, saying the documentary was in breach of a 1992 agreement, stating that the channel should not be offended or underestimated. Jackson.

In its legal complaint, the foundation said: “Michael Jackson is innocent. Point.”

it would press ahead with its plans to broadcast the four-hour film, because that would “allow everyone to evaluate the film and the allegations in it.” HBO will also follow the screening in an interview conducted by the famous anchor Oprah Winfrey with the film’s director, Dan Reid, Robinson and Saevsk, before an audience of survivors of sexual assaults.

Previous charges

In 2005, Jackson was acquitted at a California trial of sexual harassment of a 13-year-old boy at his Neverland ranch.

Prior to that, in 1994, Jackson settled a case of sexual assault on another 13-year-old child.

Taj Jackson, the nephew of the singer, says: “It’s the tenth anniversary of my uncle’s death. We have to show sadness, but instead we are bombarded with lies.”

Jackson’s sister, Jackie, also shares this view, especially as she has spent several years at the Neverland Ranch, where she sees the accusations as torture and harm, and suggests that getting money is the motivation behind her.

“I’m not interested in watching it, because I know my brother,” said Jackie, 67, the oldest of Jackson’s five brothers.

For his part, the director said that he wanted to make Wim specifically about the experience of the two men, and confirmed that the documentary includes interviews with Jackson when he was alive, in which he denies the charges against him for sexual assaults.

 

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here